The future of
WILDLANDS SURVIVAL
is in your hands.

The Langkawi Plan

The Langkawi Plan aims to reverse the disappearance of wildlands affecting fragile ecosystem of the island. The weight of this project lies in the importance of implementing networked links of wildlife habitats and creating buffer areas between human dwellings and these habitats.

Wildlife & Habitat

1. Planning

  • Taking stock
    Major open spaces and habitats areas are identified, along with landscape character and existing and historically significant vegetation.
  • Aligning the green belt
    The green belt is created to create "networked links" amongst open spaces and habitat areas, and extend new habitat into "habitat poor" surroundings.
  • Zoning the green belt
    The green belt is zoned to minimise human disruption in sensitive habitat and wildlife areas, and to incorporate outdoor nature classrooms in appropriate areas.

2. Design

  • Selecting plants
    Plants near habitat/wildlife areas are selected for their compatibility with native and or historically important vegetation in the area, and planted buffers are located along habitat edges to protect native interior habitats.
  • Designing paved and planted areas
    Various heights of vegetation are provided for "structural heterogeneity", areas of lower intensity maintenance are incorporated wherever possible, and physical connections between planted areas are established so that wildlife can move easily through the green belt.
  • Designing structures
    Materials, surfaces, signs and structures in habitat and wildlife areas are designed in harmony with the natural setting, and features such as landscape bridges are incorporated wherever possible.

3. Managing

  • Developing individualised maintenance program
    Low intensity, landscape ecology based maintenance is tailored to each part of the green belt, ecological training and education is incorporated for designers horticulturists and contractors, disruptive maintenance activities are kept away from sensitive areas and / or avoid sensitive periods, and habitats and wildlife in and around the green belt are monitored.
  • Involving stakeholders in management strategies
    Links are established with nature interest groups, educational institutions, relevant government departments and prospective nature investors such as corporations, and their views on wildlife and habitat issues are sought on a regular basis.
  • Programming for community involvement
    Interpretive features and educational programs concerning nature are implemented in consultation with nature interest groups, schools and other stakeholders; special projects such as community planting days are organised and where appropriate, land that abuts the greenbelt is negotiated as sites for on going community planting projects.

» Back to Top

People & Recreation

1. Planning

  • Taking stock
    Major centres of housing, transport and communications are identified along with existing linear routes through the urban area and important views to both natural and human made landmarks.
  • Aligning the green belt
    The green belt is located to link major tourist areas, bus and linear routes to connect homes, hotels to trails, shops, places of work and other open spaces, and to allow views to landmarks in the urban setting.
  • Zoning the green belt
    More intensively used areas are zoned for active recreation, less intensively used areas are zoned for passive recreation, and activities are located to minimise conflicts between users.

2. Design

  • Selecting plants
    Plants are selected for their qualities of sight, sound and scent, their suitability for different zones, their maintenance requirements, and in some cases their suitability for special projects such as community planting days.
  • Designing paved and planted areas
    Focal areas are incorporated in key locations along the green belt, features are included for users with special needs and separate trails for walking, cycling and other users are provided for wherever possible.
  • Designing structures
    User's preferences for elements such as seating, lighting, water features, and shelter and signs systems are design to accommodate specific user groups, and access is designed to welcome users but exclude inappropriate users such as motorcycle riding.

3. Managing

  • Developing individualised maintenance program
    Areas of more intensive maintenance are restricted to specific parts of the green belt, and user's needs are monitored continuously to keep management and maintenance programs relevant to the local community.
  • Involving stakeholders in management strategies
    The views of landowners, community groups, local residents, schools and other groups on recreation-related issues are taken into account in the management strategy, and mechanism for consultation are incorporated into the green belt development process.
  • Programming for community involvement
    Interpretive programs are developed that incorporate local historical / cultural features and cultural performances and recreational events are organised on site, as appropriate.

» Back to Top

Website by Stampede Design